As the Greenland ice melts, something horrible lurks beneath

WOODS HOLE, Mass. — Sunbury Press has released the climate fiction (Cli-Fi) thriller Ice Canyon Monster, Keith Rommel’s novella about the consequences of global warming.

What Others Are Saying:
When a Greenland shaman decides to fight back against global warming and the harm it is doing to his people, a powerful series of events unfolds in this cli-fi thriller. Keith Rommel knows how to spin a great yarn!
– Dan Bloom, The Cli-Fi Report

About the Book:
icm_fcHUNGER WILL BRING ANYTHING TO THE SURFACE …
The Eskimo people of Greenland have grown tired of the damage being done to their country. Global warming from emissions that stem from the shipping lanes that run between Canada and Greenland has made people that live close to the coast sick. Cancer, asthma and as many as 5,000 deaths a year have been attributed to this pollution. A single cargo ship in one year burns more emissions than 50 million gasoline burning vehicles.

When Akutak, a Greenlandic Shaman Eskimo, decides to take action against the things that are destroying his country, he uses the ancient arts and creates a tupilak and with it and conjures a curse. Designed in the form of an octopus, this Goliath is going to become Greenland’s guardian and do everything within its power to stop the erosion of the ice sheet.

But not everyone sees the Tupilak Octopus as a champion and they seek to destroy it. But the only way to destroy it is to conjure something more powerful and Akutak may be Greenland’s most powerful shaman.

This novelette is part of the Cli-Fi movement and contains stunning facts surrounding Greenland and the danger this beautiful country faces from big oil to overused shipping lanes. Akutak and his Tupilak Octopus has one message: leave Greenland alone! – Read this highly educational novel with a great fiction story intertwined within the startling facts.

Excerpt:
Akutak knelt down on the hard, cold surface of a mountainous ice sheet that overlooked the valley’s deep ice canyon. A large rivulet carried fast-moving glacial water, and the sound of the running river was loud enough to reach Akutak even at this altitude.

Located in the interior of Greenland, beneath the ice sheet and river flow, was a canyon that snaked around and reached the Petermann Glacier on the northern coast. The water melt also flowed beneath the ice and was released into the Arctic Ocean.

True to old tradition almost lost throughout the centuries, Akutak wore the skins of animals that were captured for their meat. The skins were sewn together by his wife. She was a skilled seamstress and made him kamiks, trousers and anoraks, gloves and a hat. It was her skill that protected him against the harsh elements and kept him alive. Knowing she made the clothing, the frigid cold was of no concern; in Greenland it is said a man is what his wife makes him.

Opening the flap of an animal skin sack that was slung over his shoulder, he peered inside and saw what he had placed there before he left home at first light.

The wind whipped and reminded Akutak that where he was was inhospitable and unwelcoming. But still, he continued to move forward with the plan that took him nearly two years to complete; shrouded in silence even to his kin. What he created and what he was about to do was never shared with anyone else. It couldn’t be because that was the way.

He carefully reached into his sack and pulled out a hand-sized tupilaq. This carefully handmade avenging monster was created to keep people away from his native land, which was shrinking each year because of global warming.

The shaman began to chant in his native tongue of Inuit. He called forth in a repeated rhythmic sound, reciting his desire to make those who caused it to pay for what his country was suffering. He wanted to instill fear and summoned a beast, large and unstoppable, filled with the rage of his ancestors. This beast would do terrible things to keep people away from Greenland.

He looked at the tupilaq, made the traditional way to ensure its effectiveness; the design represented exactly what he foresaw as being the bringer of fear and order, death, and a reluctance to challenge the waters around Greenland. Made from carved bone, dried and stretched skin, woven hair and sinew, the totem even contained parts from dead children.

Drawing himself close to the ridge, each footfall carefully placed so as not to plunge to his death, his chant continued as he looked over the edge and into the clear water. He held onto the tupilaq, looked at his work one last time to make sure it was good enough, and then held it out and released it over the flowing water.

About the Author:
Keith Rommel is the author of numerous fiction thrillers, best known for his Thanatology Series, which includes The Cursed Man, and The Lurking Man, both of which are becoming Hollywood movies. Keith is also a screenwriter.

Ice Canyon Monster
Authored by Keith Rommel
List Price: $9.99
5″ x 8″ (12.7 x 20.32 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
136 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067222
ISBN-10: 1620067226
BISAC: Fiction / Sea Stories

Also available on Kindle

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Ice-Canyon-Monster-9781620067222.htm

Prisoner’s life or death decided by public opinion — goes viral on social media

MENLO PARK, Calif. — Sunbury Press has released Joseph Carvalko’s latest novel, Death by Internet, speculative fiction about a prisoner who is at the mercy of public opinion via social media.

dbi_fc lkAbout the Book:
THE SPIRITUALITY OF NATURE CONFRONTS TECHNOLOGY TO DISCOVER THE ESSENCE OF MERCY AND CRUELTY

Carvalko takes the reader to the outer edge of technology and ethics in a speculative fiction that evokes the bizarre power of the Internet to reveal if the world is merciful.

Strapped down and dying in a prison cell, Sam Mariani tells how he had invited the public to respond to his blog, but rather than click the familiar “Like” button as on Facebook, they voted to either “Die” or “Live”, depending on whether they agreed with his opinion, which in turn forced the protagonist to inhale, through a valve, minuscule doses of cyanide or its antidote.

In his quest for humanity, the site goes viral attracting millions, but has the unintended consequences of riling the masses, who take to the streets, some elevating him to the prominence of a messiah, causing the government, fearing a revolution, to attack him via cyber warfare.

What Others Are Saying:
If you delight in fiction that engages the reader in an ethical dilemma, you’ll love this contemporary allegory, which journeys from Wounded Knee to a macabre life and death experiment on the Internet.

— Wendell Wallach author of A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology From Slipping Beyond Our Control.

Excerpt:
LONG BEFORE THEY arrested me for cybercrimes and “manifest acts of violence against the government,” I chose to live off the grid, and then, yes, hell yes, one day, I plugged myself back into technology to answer humankind’s most profound question: had we become its master, or its servant for executing a nondescript manifesto against the common “good.”

Surreptitiously, all things digital quashed any semblance of free will. Waves of diffused “ones and zeros” relegated every man, woman, and child to the status of an inextricable component in a closed circuit. Increasingly powerful technology came out of the cloud firing electric missiles that struck the center of humanity’s imagination, wresting the power to choose, to farm or forage, to make peace, to save Earth from a thermal meltdown.

In less than a generation, new lexicons appeared: metadata, fail whale, Google bomb, shock site, troll, electronic medical prescription, facial recognition, crime-seeking drone. So-called friends posted façades on Facebook buying into an illusion of open connectedness, while satellites furtively circled the planet compiling dossiers on law-abiding masses. Multinationals launched an array of robotized medicine, banking, education, and apps that drove our cars. We measured deeds in bits, bytes, and dollars, becoming a dehumanized embodiment, a necessary cog, in all manner of electronic computation and control.

Yes, I railed against an assault aimed squarely at the heart of civilization, and for this, they called me a sociopath and charged me with cybercrimes, punishable by death.

carvalkoAbout the Author:
Joseph Carvalko is adjunct Professor of Law, Science and Technology at Quinnipiac University School of Law as well as a patent attorney and electrical engineer (holding ten patents including medical devices and computer/communications systems technology). He is a member of the Community Bioethics Forum, Yale School of Medicine and a member of the Yale Technology and Ethics working group. He has authored papers related to law and technology, and drafted hundreds of patent applications during his career. Formerly he was a research associate in the biomedical engineering field, designing and programming cellular automata computers for artificial intelligence applications in cytological pattern recognition, and afterward worked extensively developing computers and telecommunications.

Death by Internet

Authored by Joseph Carvalko

List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on White paper
242 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620067055
ISBN-10: 1620067056
BISAC: Fiction / Dystopian

Also available on Kindle
For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Death-by-Internet-978162…

Directed energy weapon subject of first novel by former US vice admiral

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Sunbury Press has released vice admiral Scot McCauley’s first novel, Israel Under Siege, concerning the international intrigue around a viable directed energy weapon (DEW).

About the Book:
ius_fcIn a desperate scramble for energy, Japan and China are on a collision course–and Russia finds itself caught in the middle. Cole Palmer, and his wife, Liz, professors at the University of Indiana, but previously government operatives, find themselves plunged into this perilous situation when a close friend, Jack Tisdale, is wounded and trapped in a remote part of China. Tisdale had been dispatched by Secretary of State David Andrews to mount a covert US/Russian reconnaissance mission of a highly secretive Chinese research facility funded and directed by the international billionaire, Kenryo Chen. Rumors focus on a possible technological break-through in the area of directed energy.

Both Cole and Liz Palmer have good reason to be wary of Andrews, a man known to ruthlessly put people, even friends, in harm’s way to advance his personal objectives. Cole had been nearly killed during a previous operation set in motion by Andrews during the previous administration when Andrews served as National Security Adviser.

With a strong sense of loyalty and obligation to his close friend, Cole takes the lead and successfully rescues Tisdale. But returning to Washington, they are unable to extricate themselves from a vastly more sinister plot.

As Andrews prepares for the World Summit Conference in St. Petersburg, one to which China has not been invited; a priceless piece of intelligence is delivered to him by Cole and Liz. They have made contact with a highly placed Russian source, someone who believes that the intelligence will help Russia to move to the West. Cole and Liz will ultimately have to protect their source by spiriting him out of Russia using means that involve, without his knowledge, the President of the United States.

As the world powers focus on the upcoming World Summit Conference in St. Petersburg and escalating tensions of a global energy war, Kenryo Chen seizes the opportunity to play out his long festering hatred of the Zionist nation. The deployment of the Directed Energy Weapon to the United States foreshadows the first step of a well-conceived diabolical plan to destroy Israel.

The suspenseful account of this unexpected crisis raises the temperature to a boiling point. The outcome will prove to be as much of a surprise to Cole Palmer as it is to the reader. This is a thriller that suggests what the headlines might be in the very near future.

Excerpt:
Manas, Kyrgyzstan.
Six men outfitted in black Nomex jumpsuits, skin caps with integrated miniature communication headsets, inflatable assault vests with magazine pouches, nervously fidgeted outside a small rust-eaten trailer. It was two hours before the first signs of dawn and dark clouds towered into the stratosphere. A line of thunderstorms to the northeast with flashes of lightening added to the foreboding atmosphere. Pulsating lights from a nearby idling Special Forces helicopter casted a dancing glare on the dew glistened tarmac. Across the runway, intermittent puffs of morning mist distorted the recently completed new Manas International Airport . . . surreal images of glass and metal structures crisscrossing without endpoints. The U.S Support Facility’s corrugated Quonset-huts and trailers across the tarmac were a far cry from the more modern airport buildings, but they served their inconspicuous purpose . . . sustaining a high tempo of logistic support to Afghanistan. There was little formal protocol with the Kyrgyz government or airport authority. They didn’t care what was going-on across the tarmac as long as the outrageous rent was paid . . . rent that provided long runways for the U.S Air Force and no requirement for detailed flight plans.

Captain McGraw and his combat tested team of Special Forces had been through the drill many times before, but their dislike of patience was evident. They rechecked their weapons over and over before stowing them in waterproof pouches . . . H&R submachine guns with silencers and 9-mm Glock automatics, while muttering comments on why shit always had to happen in the middle of the night. There was one late arrival who was standing with McGraw. Jack Tisdale, a former SEAL, had replaced his best friend, Cole Palmer, as head of a secret State Department covert section. He had been tasked personally by the Secretary of State, David Andrews, for what Andrews called a joint U.S/Russian reconnaissance operation . . . whatever in the hell that meant.

The team sized up Tisdale as someone who could take care of himself. He had a compact build, about five-nine, a hundred sixty, broad shoulders down to an athletic waistline and short cropped hair. The giveaway was that he carried himself as only Special Forces do. They also knew that their boss would not jeopardize the operation with an untested ringer.

Tisdale answered his cell phone and turned to McGraw. “Okay, we have ten minutes before liftoff. Truffle made another pass and confirmed a clean drop area.” Truffle was the downlink picture from a state of the art Global Hawk drone that was orbiting their destination, a high mountainous pass separating Kyrgyzstan and China. McGraw did not bark any order but simply nodded his head to the team and they quickly stuffed their gear inside the helo. As the helo lifted up dipping its nose, Tisdale yanked his seatbelt trying to ignore the uneasiness in his gut. Crossing the border into China without a clear-cut mission made him nervous. The only positive thing that Tisdale counted on was joining-up with the Russian counterpart, Mikhail Nakolova, a former Spetsnaz officer who he knew well and trusted. He also was banking on getting some mission answers and specifically how he got shanghaied into being part of it. He flashed back to last week’s Washington’s intelligence briefings. Once the window dressing was peeled back, it appeared to Tisdale that the U.S agreed . . . or more specifically, David Andrews . . . to a high level request from the Kremlin for Jack Tisdale, to be part of a joint U.S/Russian surveillance operation into the Western Chinese border area. When he questioned the Washington analysts, it became clear they were also in the dark like him . . . which he didn’t believe. The storyline was that the Russians were spooked by something going-on at a remote Chinese research facility across the border. And supposedly, the Russians were hitting blanks with satellite and signal intercepts in their attempts to find out. Then, when a Russian version of the U.S intelligence platform, the U2, went missing while flying a so-called ‘training’ mission over the area, the Kremlin went nuts. Since that time, covering about three weeks, all search and rescue attempts had been stubbornly refused by the Chinese. The Chinese line was straight forward. The loss of an aircraft was a complete fabrication by the Russians to infiltrate the area and find out about the research facility. The green eye-shade folks in DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency) had nothing from satellite surveillance to support the loss of the aircraft and the State Department Western China Desk was unaware of any significant happenings in the vast desert region. Tisdale had given up trying to figure it out but the uneasy feeling that David Andrews had again cooked something up to enhance his political aspirations remained. And now in the middle of the night in some god-forsaken land, he was part of a mission without understanding what game was being played.

About the Author:
Scot McCauley is a retired naval officer with over 30 years of active duty service in the U.S. Navy. He is highly decorated and was awarded several Bronze Stars for combat service and the Purple Heart. Admiral McCauley received a BSEE from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. He subsequently earned masters and doctoral degrees in finance and economics and studied at the Royal Naval College in Greenwich, England.

Admiral McCauley’s sea service included command of river boats in Vietnam, destroyers, cruisers and aircraft carrier battle groups. He ultimately commanded all Naval Surface Forces in the Atlantic.

His shore assignments included Commandant of Midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy and several Washington tours associated with the programming and budgeting of major weapon systems including sponsorship of the Center for Naval Analysis.

Following retirement from the naval service, Admiral McCauley has been employed as a corporate officer, foundation director and consultant. Admiral McCauley has served on numerous corporate boards including Pacific Specialty Insurance Company, Actuarial Consulting Group, Northrop Grumman Ship Systems, Nortel Government Solutions and High-Tech Engineering.

Israel Under Siege
Authored by Scot McCauley
List Price: $16.95
5.5″ x 8.5″ (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
232 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066751
ISBN-10: 1620066750
BISAC: Fiction / Espionage

Also available on Kindle
For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Israel-Under-Siege-97816…

”Cli-Fi” Ruminations Pose Philosophical and Literary Questions About the Purpose and Direction of Cli-Fi Genre

INTRO:

IMG_20140518_201141[1]On Twitter, Cli-fi theorist Dan Bloom has shared many of his cli-fi musings, and compiled a list of them to share with other people — mostly intended, he says, for potential or would-be cli-fi novelists, academics studying the emergence of the genre, reporters researching news story about the rising genre and of course, current cli-fi writers themselves. And, he points out, readers of cli-fi, too.

You can find his list of some of his cli-fi thoughts on a blog here. We recently asked Bloom, who is not a novelist or a literary critic, why he sat down to write these thoughts down and how he did it, and who he had in mind when he wrote them down. He was kind enough to reply in a few emails to explain his zen-like ”cli-fi ruminations.”

QUESTION: So, Dan, what’s this all about? You’re not an academic, you don’t have a PhD, you’re not a literary theorist or a literary critic or a novelist, so what were you driving at in writing these thoughts down? And how did you do it?

DAN BLOOM: I wanted to gather my thoughts about what direction I felt cli-fi is going in, should go in, might go in in the future, and its philosophical and literary meanings. So using the 140 chararacter limit of the usual Twitter post, in order to keep my thoughts concise and brief — and readable, without being verbose — I sat down on my bed in my spare time, and lying on my back with my head propped up on a pillow, I merely jotted down on my cellphone screen shorts Tweets either late at night or early in the morning. I was just thinking to myself, and thought the ideas might be useful to writers, critics, academics, literary theorists, PhD scholars, book reviewers and readers.

QUESTION: And what do you hope the publication of these ideas might do?

DAN BLOOM: I wrote them down with no real purpose or intention, other than to try my hand at putting my thoughts down on paper (on screen, that is) and to see if anybody out there in readerland or writerland or academia or the literary criticism or book reviewer world might find some of the “cli-fi ruminations” useful or food for thought. That’s all. I mostly wrote them down for myself, though, to think out loud to myself and for myself, and to try to clarify in my own mind what cli-fi is all about now and might be about in the future. I really didn’t have any real purpose in mind, just to use the Twitter format to keep things neat and concise. And, I found out, as I began writing them down, about ten or twelve at every sitting, that the ideas were interesting and provocative to me, if nobody else. So I found the exercise, the thought experiment, useful for me, first of all. If anyone else gets anything out of them, great. I really just wanted to experiment with a short concise form to write down some ideas I have about the direction of cli-fi and its future.

QUESTION: So, then, which ones did you like best and which ones didn’t you like so much, after you wrote them down?

DAN BLOOM: Good question. In fact, I wrote them all down, without thinking of which ones “worked” or which ones didn’t. I just wanted to make a record and then see later on if it added up to anything. So yes, some of the ruminations work very well, and some don’t work as well, too, and I decided in the end, that in fact, it’s up to each reader to decide which of these ruminnations work for them, and which ones don’t. I didn’t edit myself, and I just let the thoughts come out, almost like writing poetry. The ideas just came out of my mind as I began typing. I am now writing about ten a day, and I plan to compile 100 or 500 or 1000 eventually. But I will be happy to reach 100.

QUESTION: Can you give us some examples of which ones you like best?

DAN BLOOM: Well, I like them  all, of course, They are just a record of my thoughts as I jotted them down. But on looking at them later, I do see that some of them are more positive and inspiritng and even motivational than some of the others, which might seem dystopian or apocalyptic to other people. So I feel that it’s up to each reader to take the ruminations and check off the ones they like and the ones they don’t like so much. To five you an example, below I will mark in BLUE those ruminations I like best because I feel they might be useful to literary critics and writers and readers who want to understand what cli-fi is. And every reader will have different choices. I think that is what is most interesting about this thought exercise. Everyone will have different reactions. So here they are:

​• Cli-fi isn’t a marketing term or a bookstore shelving category, and it’s more than a literary term. It’s a password into the future and those who know it, know.

  • ​Cli-fi is more than a genre term, much more than that: it’s a code word, a password, a secret handshake; it is bringing us together as one
  • ​ Cli-Fi is not for you or your children or grandkids, no. It’s codeword for future generations, as yet unborn. And born they shall be. In next 30 generations.​
  • Cli-Fi cannot, will not, save us from what’s coming. Too late for that. But it’s here, now, always. We have 30 generations to prepare. See?
  • In the future, come 30 more generations of man, there will be no Cli-Fi. By 2500 A.D. (Anthrocenus Deflexus) it will be too late.
  • People want cli-fi to offer solutions, comfortable happy fixes. Aint gonna happen. We are ”doomed, doomed” as a species, and we did it to ourselves.

​• Cli-Fi cannot, will not, save us from what’s coming. Too late for that. But it’s here, now, always. We have 30 generations to prepare. There’s time.

​• Cli-fi won’t make much of a difference either way you define it. It’s just here, now, beckoning future writers. It’s not sci-fi, never was

  • Cli-fi is more than a mere genre: it’s a cri de coeur, a warning flare, a pathway to the future before it’s too late. See? #CliFi’s here now​
  • If the rising new literary term “cli-fi” makes you ‘cringe’ at first sight or hearing, don’t give up on it yet. With time, you will come to see it for what it is.
  • ​ Cli-fi is not sci-fi, it is not eco-fiction, it is not subgenred to anything earlier. #CliFi is a hashtag burning its stamp into our very skin, as we prepare.
  • ​Cli-fi is more than a genre term, much more than that: it’s a code word, a password, a secret handshake; it is bringing us together as one.
  • Cli-fi wasn’t just a case of slapping a new name on an old genre. It’s much deeper and existential than that. Think game-changer, new directions.
  • We’ll never make it out of here alive. That’s cli-fi in a nutshell. Man the lifeboats, prepare to test the seas of one season after the next.
  • Cli-fi defines a line the sands of time that no man can cross without trepidation or reverence. There’s a reason we are here. What is it?
  • If cli-fi is one thing, it’s a chance to choose our future. One door leads here, another door leads there. Choose wisely: Your descendants are waiting.
  • There’s a tragic flaw in our genes, a selfish shellfish that doesn’t want to share. This DNA will be our downfall. This Earth shall abide.
  • Cli-fi doesn’t choose sides. We do. Choose your weapon, use it wisely. We are here by the grace of God, and someday we won’t be. God knows.
  • You could say that in a post-sci-fi world, cli-fi has come to rescue us from oblivion. Not true. No way.
  • You might not really be interested in cli-fi, or where it is going. But trust me, cli-fi is interested in you. Why? Becos the End is nigh
  • When all is said and done, cli-fi points in only one direction. It’s for everyone to find it on their own. ON THE BEACH from 1957 has clues.
  • Cli-fi is not about who coined it or who popularized it. It’s about much more pressing things, like how many more generations before the End?
  • I never met a future I didn’t like. No, that can’t be true. Some futures spell the end of humankind. It’s in the cards. Choose your exit.
  • Cli-fi is neither pro nor con. It just is. Take your pick. Choose yr sides. We are at war w/ a future that threatens all futures. Arise!
  • Cli-fi is so much a part of this world that on first hearing the word or seeing it in print, it slips right by, invisble, unnoticed.
  • If by some remote chance you find yourself reading a cli-fi novel without realizing it’s cli-fi, you have arrived.
  • There are are still 30 generations to be born before the real apocalypse begins. This now is just a rehearsal. An audition.
  • Cli-fi leads to a meeting of the minds, borderless, rudderless, unconsolable. Will we get there on time?
  • If you think time is running out, or has already run out, in terms of the unspeakable cli-fi future we face, you are very close to solving the riddle. Why are we here?
  • I don’t want to sound pessimistic, as optimism must abound and console us. But listen to the wind, hear the chimes sing, ring.
  • Cli-fi has a place in our hearts and minds, now and forever. But forever is no longer forever. We sold the farm.
  • Cli-fi can, and will, shine a light on the darkness that is about to befall us. Let’s stick together and shoulder the burden.
  • You didn’t know cli-fi was coming. Nobody did. It’s taken us by surprise.
  • There will be days when cli-fi is beyond us, unscoutable, undetected. All the more reason to pay attention.
  • Cli-fi doesn’t mean resignation or giving in to the darkness ahead. To the contrary, it means taking up arms.
  • If a time shall come when all else fails, cli-fi may just come to the rescue. Make room.
  • Cli-fi cannot answer all our questions or undo the deeds we have done. No. But she can unburden us of our fears.
  • There will come a time when there is no time left. That’s where, and when, cli-fi comes in.
  • Who will write the cli-fi of the future? They will be legion, legends. Welcome them.
  • Cli-fi is more than a mere genre term, much more than a literary term. It’s a battle cry, a cri decoeur, a shout-out to future generations: “We tried to warn you!”
  • Think positive, think cli-fi. Think future generations, think now. Think the end is nigh unless we change our ways.
  • There is no way out of here, said the sailors to the sun. Thirty more generations is all we have left. What then?
  • Ploddingly, one step at a time, we are marching to future days. Cli-fi cannot stop the deluge, yet we must not surrender. Never.
  • With sea levels rising in future times, Nature has been turned on its head. Cli-fi paints a picture, sight unseen.
  • If we could see CO2, smell it, know that is there, over-loaded, we might be able to put out the fires. But it is invisible, odorless.
  • Whatever generation you belong to, know in your heart that there is no way out of here. Nature has spoken, Earth recoils. Write on.
  • To show respect to the Earth, which is our home in the cosmos, please always capitalize the word as ”Earth.” Earth matters, tell the copy desk. Lowercasing it is beneath us.
  • Cli-fi cannot, will not, lead the way. This is a clean-up action, and way too late. But it matters nevertheless.
  • One cannot see the future, cli-fi is blind. But the stories we tell will matter, even if it is all for naught.
  • Cli-fi, by indirection finds direction out. Your words on the page must be balanced, insistent. Always. And never lose hope.
  • Not doomed yet? What will it take to connect the dots? Not doomed yet? Some overly-rosy displays of optimism in print could be seen as pathological.
  • As humans, ike all life forms, we are hardwired and programmed to believe that the near future will be similar to the recent past. Our Achilles heel, so to speak.
  • Cli-fi won’t solve our problems, and can’t undo what’s done. Fasten your seatbelts. This is a ride to Hell.
  • Climate change is more than a fact of life. It is the result of human ingenuity, greed, rapaciousness and fear. Fear not: cli-fi is here. Write it.
  • I came to the table naive and unquestioning. I left totally convinced there will be dead people, lots of dead people. That was the genesis of cli-fi.
  • You might not want to go down the cli-fi road, and that’s okay. It’s not a pretty picture, not a happy selfie. It’s disaster, writ large.
  • In the long and rambling history of humankind, cli-fi will be just a blip on the radar screen. Pay it no heed.
  • You weren’t born yesterday. Your descendants may not even be born at all, ever.   That’s how unfathomable cli-fi is.
  • If you can manage to fit the personal stories of cli-fi between the covers of a book, do it. With trepidation. Know your audience.
  • Cli-fi will have no denouement, no act three, no happy ending, no Greek chorus, no social media take-away. Push send.
  • Sorry, but this is how cli-fi is going to be, in the Anthropocene. Just 12 letters spelling doom.
  • I wish there was some cli-fi way out of here, but there ain’t. Ain’t ain’t ain’t. Ain’t ain’t ain’t times, ten thousand times ain’t.
QUESTION: So in the end, what were  you driving at?
DAN BLOOM: You know, as this all unfolded, I had no idea what I was doing, nor did I want to know what I was doing. I just did it. They came to me, when I made in the evenings or in the early mornings. I hope they will prove useful to some people — maybe cli-fi novelists working now or in the future with the genre, or maybe readers or literary critics or academics writing papers about cli-fi for academic or research journals. I amost feel like this was a kind of automatic writing. I just wrote down what was in my mind, and one idea led to another, one by one. But not all of them “work.” But I will let others decide for themselves which ones work and which ones don’t. For them. For me, they all work. I was just sitting in bed jotting things down to myself.

The end of civilization as we know it due to climate change? Read Ed Rubin’s cli-fi novel

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Sunbury Press has released The Heatstroke Line, Edward ‘s L Rubin’s first novel, a Cli-Fi thriller set in the near future.

thsl_fc‘Edward Rubin has temporarily exchanged his academic cap for a novelist’s hat and has written a powerful cli-fi novel set in the near future.

”He knows that “Mad Max,” “The Hunger Games,” “Waterworld,” “The Walking Dead,” and innumerable other books, movies and TV series attract large audiences by portraying a future where society has been devastated by war, disease, environmental calamity or supernatural disaster. Such post-apocalyptic tales constitute an important and widely-popular genre.

”As a novelist, Rubin wants to place his own cli-fi footprint in the sands of time and hopes that his book will serve as a kind of warning flare for readers now and in the future.”  — Dan Bloom, The Cli-Fi Report

EXCERPT:
Daniel Danten didn’t really want to have a family. What he wanted was to be a scientist, to teach at a university and produce original research. But this seemed so unlikely, given the state of things in Mountain America, that he decided to hedge his bets or he’d have nothing to show for his life. So he married a woman he convinced himself he was in love with and had three children. As it turned out, somewhat to his own surprise, he achieved his original goal, probably because he switched fields from astronomy to entomology, a subject of enormous practical concern these days. And now, with a secure position at one of Mountain America’s leading universities, his own lab, and a substantial list of publications to his credit, he spent most of his time worrying about his family. His wife, Garenika, was depressed, his ten year old son Michael was suffering from one of the many mysterious ailments that were appearing without warning or explanation, and his fourteen year old daughter Senly was hooked on Phantasie and running wild. Worst of all, his sixteen year old, Joshua, who had always been such a reliable, level-headed and generally gratifying son, had become an American Patriot.

On a blazing, early September afternoon, with the outdoor temperature spiking at 130 degrees Fahrenheit, he was sitting with Garenika in the waiting room at Denver Diagnostic Clinic while Michael was being examined by still one more doctor. Garenika thought they would get some sort of answer this time, but Dan was convinced that the doctor would come out of the examining room and say that she really couldn’t tell them what the problem is. Senly was spending a rare evening at home and Joshua was just returning from his field trip to the Enamel, an expedition that, Dan felt sure, was designed to make the participants angry, rather than providing them with information. The doctor appeared and Garenika jumped to her feet.

“Well,” the doctor said, “I really can’t tell you what the problem is.”

“Why not?” Garenika asked, her voice tinged with its increasingly frequent sense of panic. “Why can’t you find an answer for us? Look at him—he’s losing weight, his skin keeps getting blotchier, and he’s exhausted all the time.”

“I’m sorry. As you probably know, we’re pretty sure that we’re seeing all these new diseases because the climate change has wiped out a lot of the beneficial bacteria that we used to have in our bodies. Commensals, they’re called. But we’ve never really figured out how they work, so it’s hard to compensate for their disappearance.”

“Okay,” said Dan. “So what can we do for Michael?”

“Keep him comfortable and give it time. Put cold compresses on any area where there’s a rash. Try to get him to eat, lots of small meals if he can’t tolerate a large one. We’re expecting some new medicines from Canada that may relieve the symptoms. Michael’s getting dressed; he’ll be out a few minutes.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Edward Rubin is Professor of Law and Political Science at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. He is the author of ​ an academic book titled​ “Soul, Self, and Society: The New Morality and the Modern State.”
​. ​
”The Heatstroke Line” is his first novel. For more information, see ​his website at www.edwardrubin.com.

The Heatstroke Line: A Cli-Fi Novel
Authored by Edward L Rubin
List Price: $14.95
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
228 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620066263
ISBN-10: 1620066262
BISAC: Fiction / Science Fiction / Apocalyptic & Post-Apocalyptic

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Heatstroke-Line-9781…

First animals on land discovered in ancient Wisconsin tidal flats

WAUSAU, Wis.Sunbury Press has released The Fossils of Blackberry Hill: Solving the Mystery of the First Animals on Land, by Kenneth Gass.

tfobbh_fcAbout the Book:
The Fossils of Blackberry Hill: Solving the Mystery of the First Animals on Land is the first book to cover the unique group of rock outcrops in Central Wisconsin that appears to have put an end to a one-hundred-fifty-year-old mystery of global interest. Since the mid-eighteen-hundreds, fossilized footprints and trackways have been found on beach deposits in what is now North America that dated back to the Cambrian Period, some five hundred million years ago – but fossils of the animals that made them avoided detection all that time. Thanks to Blackberry Hill, the identity of some of the first animals to walk on land is a secret no more. Numerous color photographs of spectacularly preserved tidal flat trackways, animals, and parts of the habitat itself, all frozen in stone, help to tell the story of some of the first animals to explore this strange, new environment. Current interpretations made possible by the fossil discoveries are presented, including how some of the trackways were made and what might have lured the animals ashore. Peculiar, winding trackways from giant, slug-like organisms and other boneless animals are shown covering entire surfaces. This book also shows other surprises revealed at Blackberry Hill, including body and trace fossils of another tidal flat dweller never before found in rocks as old as these, and the first occurrence to show that large jellyfish were abundant in Cambrian times and were already subject to mass strandings. In this book, Kenneth Gass thus demonstrates why Blackberry Hill holds its special place in the history of life on Earth.

What Others Are Saying:
“A mystery revealed, The Fossils of Blackberry Hill  charmingly tells the story of how clever scientific detective work has answered the question of what those first animals to visit the subaerial environments of our world really were—however fleeting their visits from their ancient ocean habitats may have been. Engagingly told by Chris Gass, one of the key participants, the story reveals the importance of a highly special area that holds the fossilized evidence that shows what really happened … ” – Niles Eldredge, evolutionary biologist, author

“The early history of life on land is a conundrum that has perplexed some of the foremost figures in the history of paleontology since the era of Richard Owen and Charles Darwin over 150 years ago. At center stage in this mystery are trackways on sedimentary rocks that we now know are of Cambrian age – some 500 million years old – and were made by animals making the first excursions out of water in life’s history. In The Fossils of Blackberry Hill, Chris Gass weaves together the history of science and groundbreaking research conducted over the past 20 years to reveal the identities of these ancient trace makers. His book is a scientific detective story in words and photographs.” – Gregory D. Edgecombe, The Natural History Museum (London)

“An absorbing introduction to a rich source of paleontological information . . . fascinating color photographs . . . the book offers intriguing examples of how paleontology works . . . appealing scientific detective story.” – Kirkus Reviews

P79About the Author
Kenneth Gass, known as Chris to his family and friends, has a degree in Geological Sciences from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. He has published in peer-reviewed journals and magazines, and he is content contributor to the Paleontology Portal and Paleobiology Database. Gass has also written books on subjects ranging from paleontology to procedures. One of his works relating to discoveries at Blackberry Hill received Honorable Mention for Best Paper Award.

Chris and his wife, Lauri, live in Wisconsin Rapids with their two dogs, not far from their six children and eleven grandchildren.

The Fossils of Blackberry Hill: Solving the Mystery of the First Animals on Land
Authored by Kenneth Gass
List Price: $29.95
Hardcover: 128 pages w/color photos
Publisher: Sunbury Press, Inc. (April 14, 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1620065878
ISBN-13: 978-1620065877
Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
Shipping Weight: 13.8 ounces
BISAC: Science / Paleontology

For more information, please see:
http://www.sunburypressstore.com/The-Fossils-of-Blackberr…

Troutman recounts billions of years of history in the Mahanoy, Mahantongo and Lykens Valleys

POTTSVILLE, Pa.Sunbury Press has released Steve E. Troutman’sGeology of the Mahanoy, Mahantongo, and Lykens Valleys: Something about the Earth We Walk On.

gotmmalv_fcAbout the Book:
Author Steve E. Troutman taps his training in geology to take you on a tour of the Mahantongo, Mahanoy and Lykens Valleys from the beginning of time until humans arrived. Steve explains in layman’s terms the variety of geological features present as well as the conditions that led to them. He also includes images and discussions about the flora and fauna that were present during the geologic time scale.

Excerpt:
Let us now consider our local area comprised of the Mahanoy, Mahantongo and Lykens Valleys. Within the larger Mahantongo Valley is contained the Hoofland Valley. Within in the Lykens Valley is contained the coal bearing rock layers of Bear Valley which is north of Williamstown. Within the Mahanoy Valley is contained the coal bearing rock near Trevorton.

All the rocks in the area of our study are sedimentary. These rocks all originated within water or were associated with water as their environment of deposition. Red mud like is found on the Mississippi Delta, forms into red shale layers. Deep water sediments, such as in the Caribbean Sea today, are calcium rich and become limestone. Sands like those found at the ocean beaches are turned into sandstone. These layers of sedimentary rocks are termed rock strata. Sandstone which contains larger sedimentary grains of various sizes including larger pebbles is named conglomerate.

About the Author:
071 (2)

Steve Troutman was born in 1952, into a family with many living grandparents, all with roots in the Mahantongo Valley of Pennsylvania. He developed an interest in genealogy at an early age due to his parents’ interest in family history. Steve studied geology at Franklin and Marshall College, but did not pursue a career in this field. Instead, he continued working for the family business, Troutman Bros. Inc. of Klingerstown, Pa. He is the author of many books on local history and genealogy, including several with his wife, Joan. The Troutmans live and work in the heart of the Mahantongo Valley.

Geology of the Mahanoy, Mahantongo, and Lykens Valleys: Something about the Earth We Walk On
Authored by Steve E. Troutman
List Price: $29.95
8″ x 10″ (20.32 x 25.4 cm)
Full Color on White paper
74 pages
Sunbury Press, Inc.
ISBN-13: 978-1620065198
ISBN-10: 1620065193
BISAC: Science / Earth Sciences / Geology

http://www.sunburypressstore.com/Geology-of-the-Mahanoy-M…